An interview with Juan Gorraiz

An interview with Juan Gorraiz, director of the Bibliometrics and Publications Strategies department at Vienna University Library Nicolas Robinson interviews Juan Gorraiz, who works at Vienna University Library as a professional bibliometrician. Juan is editing a special issue for Frontiers in Research Metrics and Analytics on best practices in bibliometrics. Along with his professional activity …

Community responses to commercial metrics tools: the responsible use guides

Robyn Price and Andrew Gray introduce the InCites and SciVal responsible use guides, a new series from the LIS Bibliometric Committee to promote informed use of commercial metrics products. InCites, owned by Clarivate Analytics, and SciVal, owned by Elsevier, are popular commercial analytics subscription tools used by institutions to report on research publication data. Many …

Six weeks is a long time in bibliometrics: Stability and Field-Weighted Citation Percentile

Dr Ian Rowlands, writing in a personal capacity Let’s begin with a self-evident truth: publication counts aside, bibliometric indicators often change each time new material is added to a citation database.  That’s a given, but it begs a couple of interesting questions: how much do indicators change, and how quickly?  We know that even one …

The blind and the elephant: bringing clarity to our conversations about responsible metrics

Lizzie Gadd encourages us to clarify what, why and how we are measuring before launching into any conversation about responsible metrics. I love the poem, “Five Blind Men and an Elephant” by John Godfrey Saxe. For those who’ve not read it, five blind people are confronted with an elephant and each grabs a part of …

Citation issues resulting from Canada’s new RDM mandate – a tipping point for Open Science? Guest post by Jeffrey Demaine

In this guest post, Jeffrey Demaine explores some tipping points in Open scholarly communication, and what it means in the context of Canada's research landscape. After more than a decade of incremental progress towards OpenAccess publishing, some national research-funding bodies are ready to engineer disruptive change in the way scholarly communication works. With eleven European …